“I Was Hacked!”

I guess District 3 Representative Cassandra Hernandez hasn’t been keeping up with current events. “I was hacked” seems to work perfectly good in most situations.

9 comments

  1. If it wasn’t her then it was someone authorized to use the account. If it was an unauthorized post, a police report should have already been filed.

  2. Fer cryin’ out loud! It was Facebook! Nobody should have access to your Facebook account, I don’t care who you are! I totally agree with Rich on this one. She musta been hacked.

    1. Oh FFS, she isn’t saying she was hacked because she wasn’t hacked. I’m sorry Mr Dungan but you are a few affidavits behind on this one. Hernandez and her lawyer have already submitted statements stating that it was something like an “inadvertent public announcement” by one of the people who was authorized to use the site.

      I bet she didn’t say she was hacked because someone told her that it would take like 5 seconds to disprove that by checking IP addresses and seeing that the activity came from the IP that was being used by the person in her circle who made the post.

      Yes there are ways to fake that but you have to think of that ahead of time (just like criminals can have their phones tracked, if they think to leave it at home before they go do something shady they’re fine, but they can’t hide it if they took their phone to a crime scene).

      I think what happened is that she did intend to post right up until someone asked her about the resign to run law and then she and her team panicked and now they’re lying about it being “inadvertent”.

      What was inadvertent was her resignation (she didn’t intent to do that) but she did ask that the action that triggered it be done, she just didn’t realize what that would mean.

      Honestly it sucks because the resign to run law is worded a bit too broadly (IMO), but as it stands now it’s geared more towards catching people without worrying about what their intent was, probably because it’s too easy for someone to do what Hernandez is doing now and retroactively saying that she didn’t authorize the post even though she probably did.

      As written right now the law doesn’t care what the office holder says their intent was, it cares what a random person would think it they saw the thing in question.

      1. Mr. Geek,

        I believe this whole situation transpired the way you said it did, i.e., that Ms. Hernandez approved the post, and only retracted it when made aware of the resign-to-run rule, and, at that point, she chose to throw her publicly unnamed campaign staffer under the bus.

        But she still could have used the “I was hacked” defense instead.

        The only people who could determine the IP addresses work at Facebook, and Facebook wouldn’t disclose the IP addresses unless the police got involved, and the police wouldn’t get involved unless Rep. Hernandez reported the hack.

        And let’s not pretend that lying isn’t an officially sanctioned government policy. With the notable exception of Jane Shang, government employees have lied to us for the last 15 years.

        (And what did telling the truth get Ms. Shang? Oh yeah. Sixty days paid vacation and a pension.)

        There might have been a furor. The Mayor’s minions might have huffed and puffed. But I think the Mayor’s minions have ceded the moral high ground. I think that the electorate would have just written it off to good gamesmanship.

        Some people can’t afford to tell the truth. Some people can’t afford principles. They prefer the money.

        Rich

  3. She is just wack, not hacked. If you are not a good liar your are not going to get very far in Politics. She announce her intentions on the World Wide Web. Once it goes up….that is it.

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